Strategies to Address Sleep Problems of Children and Their Parents

Sleep problems may be best considered a skill deficit, one that is common especially in children and youth with autism and developmental disabilities (63-80%, compared to 35-50% of typically developing young children). Sleep problems (difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or getting enough sleep) are associated with higher levels of severe problem behavior (meltdowns, aggression, self-injury), stereotypic self-stimulatory…

Q&A for BCBAs now available

A page dedicated to answering questions provided by BCBAs has been added to this website. This page will contain commonly asked questions regarding the practical functional assessment and treatment process, with new ones posted each week. If there is a question you would like answered, relay it to us on this new page. Click on Q&A for BCBAs above…

Experiences of BCBA Practitioners

Practical functional assessment and skill-based treatment implementation experiences by BCBAs working in clinics, schools, and homes are highlighted on this page. These videos may be useful to share with parents or other professionals who are unfamiliar with practical functional assessment processes or with skill-based treatments derived from analyses.

Updated Experience of Jessica Slaton, M.Ed., BCBA

Practitioners often report that they do not conduct functional analyses because they do not have a therapy room or sufficient staffing to maintain safety during analyses of severe problem behavior. However, when the reinforcers suspected of influencing severe problem behavior are simultaneously and immediately provided following behavior that is reported to precede severe problem behavior, sufficiently…

A Page for Parents

A new parent-friendly page has been added to this website. It is viewable in the menu bar above and provides a brief overview of the practical functional assessment and treatment process and video-based presentations describing the process through case examples. This page also provides links to websites that may allow parents to locate professionals in…

Why do an analysis if the interview results are clear?

If the interview usually leads to differentiated functional analyses, why not simply conduct the interview and forgo the analysis? There are three reasons to conduct the analysis even when the interview provides fairly straightforward information regarding the specific reinforcement contingencies likely controlling problem behavior. Although the interview may help you discover the specific reinforcement contingencies…